Archives For May 2014

I think it’s important that I preface this entry by admitting that social justice had, quite frankly, nothing to do with why I was in India.

I moved there with my family in 2009 after my dad, who works for a multi-billion dollar Fortune 50 company whose name isn’t important,was transferred to an office in Chennai, a city of roughly 8 million souls on the southeast coast of the country. There could not have been more social and economic disparity between my world and the world of so many Indians. My world had air-conditioned luxury cars, and chauffeurs who called me sir instead of my name. My world had security guards, maids, gardeners, cooks, paid vacations and 5-star restaurants; and if I wanted it to, existed primarily behind gates and tinted glass.

Most of my neighbors didn’t have shoes.

Continue Reading…

I love kids. Who doesn’t? Some of the wittiest and most fabulous people I know… are children.

And I’ve always loved supporting different causes that benefit kids around the world—mostly education. Because education is one of those few things in my life that I know is real, and good, and life changing.

But it has recently come to my attention that when we talk about children’s education, the conversation feels a bit one-sided.

Because what happens when that kid comes home from school to a family that doesn’t value education? To a mother who can’t read or write? To a father who could care less?

Take it from Jaya. As you can see, she’s obviously awesome. Continue Reading…


United Nations
: India has recorded a decline in maternal mortality rates between 1990 and 2013 but along with Nigeria it accounted for one third of the global maternal deaths last year, according to a UN report.

An estimated 289,000 women died in 2013 from complications in pregnancy and childbirth, down from 523,000 in 1990, according to World Health Organisation’s trends in maternal mortality estimates from 1990 to 2013. The figure represents a decrease of 45 per cent. Continue Reading…

When I first started working in the nonprofit field, I was a lowly intern with big ideas of a world transformed in my lifetime. Literacy felt like a nice, fluffy topic. I knew education was important—but literacy felt like such a backseat issue compared to extreme poverty, slavery, and the other deep injustices of the world. So I thought, really, let’s prioritize.

Over the years, my perspective has obviously widened and developed and grown, but I’ll admit, it wasn’t until a recent trip to India that I totally changed my mind about literacy.

Because when we talk about literacy, we’re not talking about teaching people to read and write. We’re talking about giving them the opportunity of their lives… lives that they’ll live out with purpose… lives that will help end extreme poverty, slavery, and the other deep injustices of the world.

So there I was, in a decent-sized village called Yadagirigutta, in South India, where I met Kiran.

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